How to Quickly Master CreateObject in VBA in 3 Minutes (Excel)

Written by Kasper Langmann

The Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) language is a powerful tool that can automate tasks in Microsoft Excel. One of the most useful functions in VBA is the CreateObject function. This function allows you to create and manipulate objects in Excel, such as worksheets, charts, and ranges. In this guide, we will explore how to quickly master the CreateObject function in VBA in just three minutes.

Understanding CreateObject in VBA

The CreateObject function is a built-in function in VBA that allows you to create an instance of an object from a specified class. This function is particularly useful when you need to create an object that is not part of the Excel Object Model, such as a FileSystemObject or a Word Application object.

The syntax for the CreateObject function is as follows: CreateObject(class, [server]). The class argument is a string that specifies the type of object to create. The server argument is optional and specifies the name of the network server where the object is to be created.

When to Use CreateObject

CreateObject is typically used when you need to interact with an object that is outside of the Excel Object Model. For example, you might use CreateObject to create a FileSystemObject that can read and write files on your computer.

Another common use for CreateObject is to create an instance of a Word Application object. This allows you to automate tasks in Word from within Excel. For example, you could use CreateObject to open a Word document, make changes to it, and then save and close the document.

Mastering CreateObject in 3 Minutes

Now that we understand what the CreateObject function is and when to use it, let’s explore how to quickly master this function in just three minutes.

The key to mastering CreateObject is understanding its syntax and how to use it to create different types of objects. Let’s start by looking at how to create a FileSystemObject.

Creating a FileSystemObject

To create a FileSystemObject, you would use the following code:


Dim fso As Object
Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")

This code creates a new FileSystemObject that you can use to interact with the files on your computer. For example, you could use the FileSystemObject to read the contents of a text file, like so:


Dim fso As Object
Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Dim txtFile As Object
Set txtFile = fso.OpenTextFile("C:tempsample.txt", 1)
Dim fileContents As String
fileContents = txtFile.ReadAll
txtFile.Close

This code reads the contents of the file “C:tempsample.txt” and stores it in the variable fileContents.

Creating a Word Application Object

To create a Word Application object, you would use the following code:


Dim wordApp As Object
Set wordApp = CreateObject("Word.Application")

This code creates a new Word Application object that you can use to automate tasks in Word. For example, you could use the Word Application object to open a Word document, make changes to it, and then save and close the document, like so:


Dim wordApp As Object
Set wordApp = CreateObject("Word.Application")
wordApp.Visible = True
Dim doc As Object
Set doc = wordApp.Documents.Open("C:tempsample.docx")
doc.Content.Text = "Hello, World!"
doc.Save
doc.Close
wordApp.Quit

This code opens the Word document “C:tempsample.docx”, changes its content to “Hello, World!”, saves the document, and then closes Word.

Advanced Uses of CreateObject

While the examples above demonstrate the basic usage of CreateObject, this function can be used in much more complex ways. For example, you can use CreateObject to create an instance of an Internet Explorer object, which you can then use to automate tasks in Internet Explorer.

Another advanced use of CreateObject is to create an instance of a SQL Server object. This allows you to interact with a SQL Server database directly from within Excel.

Creating an Internet Explorer Object

To create an Internet Explorer object, you would use the following code:


Dim ie As Object
Set ie = CreateObject("InternetExplorer.Application")

This code creates a new Internet Explorer object that you can use to automate tasks in Internet Explorer. For example, you could use the Internet Explorer object to navigate to a website, fill out a form, and submit the form.

Creating a SQL Server Object

To create a SQL Server object, you would use the following code:


Dim sql As Object
Set sql = CreateObject("SQLDMO.SQLServer")

This code creates a new SQL Server object that you can use to interact with a SQL Server database. For example, you could use the SQL Server object to run a query against the database and return the results.

Conclusion

The CreateObject function in VBA is a powerful tool that allows you to create and manipulate objects in Excel and other applications. By understanding its syntax and how to use it to create different types of objects, you can quickly master this function in just three minutes.

Whether you’re automating tasks in Excel, Word, Internet Explorer, or SQL Server, the CreateObject function can save you time and make your code more efficient. So why wait? Start using CreateObject today and see the difference it can make in your VBA programming.